Happy Solstice, Earthlings!

The quality of daylight starts changing as of right-now-ish.  When I lived in Alaska, I gave Solstice parties, but I was the only one mourning the return of the light.  Don’t know why, but the dark is where I thrive.  All my friends toasted the coming light….

Happy Solstice, All You Earthlings!  And, OK, you too, you lurking beings from off-planet, you cut-ups who turn my jammies inside-out in the middle of the night, who zapped my brain, and who love rock ‘n’ roll.  There’s one thing we did right, huh, rock ‘n’ roll?  I know it’s not enough right for you to want to colonize our planet.  We’ve wrecked Earth all to hell, so no, no, no no colonizing!  (I’ve seen the movies; I know how it works!)

Oh, and isn’t the word put together beautifully by those early French (based on Latin roots)!  (You may sense my linguistics minor in school!)

solstice Look up solstice at Dictionary.com
mid-13c., from O.Fr. solstice, from L. solstitium “point at which the sun seems to stand still,” from sol “sun” (see sol) + pp. stem of sistere “to come to a stop, make stand still” (see assist).
 
(Citation:  The Sciolist, and what an interesting intro page!  I may have to go back and see what else he’s talking about.  Anyone who puts together an etymology dictionary is a good kind of oddball!)
© No Stealing!  That’s what the little c in the circle means!
© lahgitana and Rockin’ the Purple, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to lahgitana and Rockin’ the Purple with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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Insularity

Let’s start out with a brief nod to the definition and etymology of the root word:

insular:

  1. of or relating to an island.
  2. remote, detached, aloof.
–from the Latin, insula,  for island.

OK, have the feeling?   If you’ve been visiting my blog, you may have noticed the post pondering the inequality of attachments.

One more thought about that:  we may notice and accept the inequality, but will quite likely never pierce the fortress walls of insularity.  I speak from experience, raw, recent, and shocking.

I hope those enisled people allow their young son to experience the world and let him off that imaginary island.  The two adults believe that circling the wagons around their little family will save them from the pain of the world.  They don’t see that it is keeping them from the richness and hope of love.

That’s the other side of that inequality sometimes.   It’s not exactly that the interest is unequal; it’s that those folks are far more interested in themselves, self-involved, enisled.

Which then means, it ain’t us–we’re still loving, balanced, willing to face the tough stuff, and able to love fully.

Whew.

© No Stealing!  That’s what the little c in the circle means!
© lahgitana and Rockin’ the Purple, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to lahgitana and Rockin’ the Purple with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Italia

For many years, I have been fascinated by the early Romans.  Geez.  They beat up everyone;  created state-sanctioned marriage in order to encourage people to have children (to strengthen the empire); built huge structures, especially aqueducts.

The climate was one of war-mongering, slavery, and assimilation.

Another fascination is with the Ancient Egyptians.  OK, they were builders and intellectuals.  Why can’t I travel in time to see both the Library at Alexandria  and the Pharos Lighthouse?  That lighthouse was around 450 feet tall!   That took a lot of slaves because who would pay a living wage for that kind of labor?  As a young child, (early 1960s) I cut out pics from the National Geographic of the fantastic sculptures–I think a dam was being built and would flood ancient structures.  (Can’t remember.)  My impression is that the Egyptians stayed home and hosted guests from out of town such as Antony and Caesar, etc.  However, there was plenty of slavery, so I must be wrong about the stayin’ home.

Then there’s Alexander the Great.  Dang, what a guy!  Warmonger and traveler.   I even named my long-ago doggie companion after Alexander–called him Iskander.

Fascination with warmongers?  I’m one who was preparing in the late 1970s to register as a conscientious objector if the draft began to include women.  In the late 1960s, I protested the Vietnam War, even tho’ I was only a kid.   On and on I could go about war, but I do see that it is what we do.  We are a horrible species, I’m just sayin’.

OK, then, Italia.   Have you seen the movie “Gladiator”?  There is a particular scene where our hero is walking up a dusty lane lined with Italian Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens), with groves of olive trees on either side.  When I see that picture, I get the scent of that dry air, dusty, and a little rosemary-ish.  How is that possible to have an olfactory experience from a place I haven’t been?  An aside, my family lived in southern Italy, Taranto, from 1960 to 1962.  Did my parents take us to the countryside where that pungent air swirled into my memory banks?

All that studying of Latin, beginning when I was 7, with Mom at the kitchen table.  I still have that workbook.  Studied Latin in college because I wanted to (along with my dearest Mal), and even had to sing Gaudeamus Igitur.  Yikes!

I have to go to Italy.  How can I not go?  Something apart from me is drawing me there.  As I study Italian right now, I keep hoping I’ll stumble into the cache of Italian language left from my toddler-hood in Taranto.  I know it’s in there!

The northwest corner of the country is my goal–on the water or in the mountains.  Close to France.  (Studied French, too; we lived in Toronto, Canada around 1970.  That’s a whole other story.)

©  No Stealing!  That’s what the little c in the circle means!
© lahgitana and Rockin’ the Purple, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to lahgitana and Rockin’ the Purple with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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